Author Archives: fossilfreeri

Impressions of Resistance: Volume 1, coming soon at RISD

This design is by Stacy Smith of RISD.  She did this as part of her thesis and is calling her project Impressions of Resistance: Volume 1 and wrote on Facebook:

New #impressionsofresistance design for Peter Nightingale of :Fossil Free RI I hope you like it, Peter.

This one broke my heart. There is still music, and hope.

Stacy created this design after an interview with Peter, who teaches physics at the University of Rhode Island and loves Renaissance music.  The background is nuclear physics in somebody’s hand-written notes.  At the bottom, between the houses is a vocal manuscript from around 1600.  What a stunning design!

If Stacy’s print sells, the $600 will go to Fossil Free Rhode Island.  Here are the details for her exhibition and its opening:

What:
Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) 2017 Thesis Exhibition Opening Reception
Wednesday May 24 from 6-8pm (cash bar)
Dates:
May 25-June 3,
Show open daily from 12-5, 10:30-6 on June 4
Where:
Rhode Island Convention Center, Hall A, One Sabin St., Providence

Grad Show Facebook event page 
Grad Show Website

To Save Life on Earth: Civil Resistance as a Moral Imperative

Presentation by Peter Nightingale, November 19, 2016, hosted by the Green Task Force of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of South County.

typhoon

This is the link to the PDF of the talk: To Save Life on Earth: Civil Resistance as a Moral Imperative.

In these times it might be good to remember the following quote from Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States.

It was the new politics of ambiguity-speaking for the lower and middle classes to get their support in times of rapid growth and potential turmoil. The two-party system came into its own in this time. To give people a choice between two different parties and allow them, in a period of rebellion, to choose the slightly more democratic one was an ingenious mode of control. Like so much in the American system, it was not devilishly contrived by some master plotters; it developed naturally out of the needs of the situation.

Take your pick: solidarity, politics or crime

[BREAKING NEWS:  Also Glocester’s town council stands in solidarity with Burrillville.  More will follow.  Back to the original post.]

Fossil Free RI member Claudia Gorman—thank you, Claudia!—explains a couple of “minor” conflicts of interest that haunt the process currently happening at the Rhode Island Energy Facility Siting Board.  The board must decide to site or not to site Invenergy’s soon-to-be-stranded asset, its proposed fossil-fuel power plant in Burrillville.

Once the power plant will get its go-ahead, which is not a done deal yet, the next question will be how our leadership will arrange matters so that We, the Rate Payers, will foot bill.  Will it be 38 Studios style bail-out, or will they come up with a new scheme to protect their corporate friends?  We’ll find out.

Here, courtesy Steve Ahlquist, is Claudia’s testimony before the Middletown Town Council:

If you do not have time to watch the video, the following summary might suffice. Everybody of Rhode Island’s leadership is in bed with everybody else.  The Public Utility Commission, which will also play a major role in a potential Woonsocket-Invenergy water deal, is so tangled up with the Raimondo administration and its Office of Energy Resources that it takes forever to explain all the conflicts of interest, but the details don’t really matter.

“Respect the process,” Governor Raimondo says.  Sure, even the Mafia has processes, but the fundamental problem is that money not only affects politics, it affect morality itself.  Here is an intriguing New York Times quote:

politics-and-crime-theyre-the-same-thing
Money, in other words, puts us in the frame of mind of Michael Corleone as he decides to enter the family business. “It’s not personal,” he tells his brother. “It’s strictly business.”

The good news is that the vast majority of humanity are good people who understand solidarity.  Steve Ahlquist’s report over at Rhode Island Future tells that part of Claudia’s story.

The bad news is that the climate change clock is ticking.  There may come a time that we’ll have to ask for forgiveness of future generations for what we did to the Earth they shall inherit.  Let me correct that: the time is now.

bike

Way too high, but nothing special about 400 ppm carbon dioxide

The world passes 400 ppm carbon dioxide threshold. Permanently

Of course, there is no threshold at 400 ppm. If there is one, it’s at 350 ppm.  As Hansen and friends discuss in Young People’s Burden: Requirement of Negative CO2 Emissions

We advocate a stricter goal, based on restoring Earth’s energy balance and limiting the period when global temperature is above the range of the Holocene; temperature stability of the Holocene has allowed sea level to be stable for the past several millennia in which civilization developed. This goal leads to a CO2 target of 350 ppm, …

350-bangladesh

Humans use the decimal system.  That’s a convention without any physical significance.  400 ppm might look special to humans, to nature it does not.  To nature 400 ppm is just an arbitrary point well into the danger zone on a curve of global exponential growth of a little over 2% increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide starting with the industrial revolution.

The 70 year rule implies that the amount of CO2 emitted by humanity into the atmosphere doubles every 35 year. Keep that in mind when you hear talk about the great things we’ll do by 2050, almost 35 years from today.

Questions on Woonsocket water for Burrillville power plant

At its meeting this Monday, October 3, the Woonsocket City Council will address the item “Power Plant – Woonsocket / Burrillville Facilities.”  This item is on the agenda at the request of Councilman Gendron. The meeting will start at 7:00 pm; follow this link for more details.

Burrillville Against Spectra Expansion (BASE) has this Facebook post:

Invenergy, the company that wants to build a massive fossil fuel power plant in Burrillville, is scrambling to find the water that they need to run the plant.

The BASE post asks people to call Woonsocket Mayor, Lisa Baldelli-Hunt, to express opposition to supplying water to Invenergy now that the Harrisville and Pascoag water districts have turned down Invenergy’s requests.

osp-eis-1988

Woonsocket’s water has played a vital role in Burrillville’s power plant projects.  The 1988 final environmental impact statement about Ocean State Power, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) raised troubling questions.  The FERC report describes the route of a ten-mile long pipeline proposed at the time to cool Ocean State Power with water withdrawn from the Blackstone river.  The report makes the common-sense observation that:

The power plant would compete with other facilities for use of available surface water.

It continues to say that “sufficient water exists in the Blackstone River at Woonsocket to supply the water needed.”  That, of course, was way back in 1988, but this summer’s drought makes one wonder, certainly in the light of videos shot in Burrillville: “you can see the parade of water trucks pulling in.”  Follow this link for more on this.

The situation in Woonsocket is one of troubled waters.  Its water system is among the first built in this country, and dates back to shortly after the establishment of the Providence water system in 1866.  That Woonsocket has an aging water supply system is no news,—witness the title of this post of last March: “Cicilline plan would help city with new water plant:”

WOONSOCKET – Citing concerns regarding the safety and security of America’s water infrastructure, U.S. Rep. David N. Cicilline is requesting that this year’s federal funding bill direct the Army Corps of Engineers to prioritize aging wastewater management systems in financially distressed municipalities …

Aging Pipes Are Poisoning America’s Tap Water” reads an attention-grabbing headline of The Atlantic and it continues with:

Flint, Woonsocket, ...

Flint, Woonsocket, …?

In Flint, Michigan, lead, copper, and bacteria are contaminating the drinking supply and making residents ill.

If that were relevant to Rhode Island, wouldn’t you expect to hear it from our leadership  Maybe … maybe not. After all, we suffer under the bipartisan consensus that lets no crisis go to waste in the battle for the privatization of everything.  (If you do not know how that works, read Naomi Klein’s Shock Doctrine.)

Woonsocket has been losing industry and business for decades. In 2012, it was threatened by bankruptcy.  There is the “Diamond Hill Road big box exodus.”  Maybe, as a consequence, it has a water surplus, although the video shown above suggests otherwise.

California has a climate-change related drought, a problem exacerbated by Mother Nature’s deplorable lack of understanding of the human law:

California’s surface and underground water is all part of the same system, yet, surface water is generally considered a public good, while ground water is considered a private good. As such, two different legal systems regulate surface and groundwater in California.

In Rhode Island, the Department of Environmental Management regulates groundwater.  God only knows who regulates surface water.
Naïvely, one might expect the RI Water Resources Board to play a central role in the process that would permit Woonsocket to sell water to Invenergy.  Unfortunately, the water board has been reduced to a shadow of its former self.  Much of its expertise has been silently washed down the drain.  How convenient a coincidence for the privatization-solves-all-problems crowd!

So if it’s not the Water Resources Board, who would give Woonsocket it’s permit?  It seems—see page 3-15 of this link—that the Rhode Island Public Utility Commission (RIPUC) once again plays a vital role in deciding the fate of Rhode Island people threatened by poverty, public heath and austerity.  Governor Raimondo supports the Burrillville power plant and that RIPUC members are gubernatorial appointees.  That, of course, gives us great confidence in the process. Yeah, right!

There you have it, the background of a potentially toxic water deal with Invenergy, a deal Woonsocket may not be in a position to refuse. Fragmented regulatory authority, the “absurd legal partitioning of Nature,” and dividing the people against ourselves are but time-honored business opportunities for global corporations.

Plant-based diets could save millions of lives and dramatically cut greenhouse gas emissions

A study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy Sciences, makes an estimate of both the health and climate change impacts of abandoning meet for plant-based diets across the world.

Pictures at a Rubber Stamp Rebellion

norman-bay-house-1

Sheldon Whitehouse supports “Clear River”

After a prolonged balancing act on the fence, Senator Whitehouse of National Grid has come down on the side of supporting Invenergy’s Clear River Energy Center in Burrillville.

The senator uses his same old arguments about choke points and price spikes.  That none of those were seen during last year’s winter has not affected his thinking.  What does Reuters know when they write about As New England freezes, natural gas stays cheap?
SheldonW

Senator Whitehouse’s and climate speeches! You have to wonder: does he realize that he is just providing cover for Obama who systematically does the opposite of what he says?